Our Top 5 Soap Recipes to Improve the Health of Your Skin

Our Top 5 Soap Recipes to Improve the Health of Your Skin

Our Top 5 Soap Recipes to Improve the Health of Your Skin – Given that the practice offers the chance to customise a cosmetic product perfectly, it’s no surprise that at-home soapmaking is a hugely popular hobby. The process is usually simpler than many beginners might expect, and with a little research and practice, you can be making your own perfect soaps in a relatively short period of time. 

Most advantageously of all, you’ll also be able to select ingredients that meet your own specific requirements when you decide to DIY your own soap products. One of the most common aims people wish to achieve when making their own soap is improving the overall health of their skin, so in this piece, we’re going to investigate five incredible ingredients that will help you achieve this goal. 

#1 – Beeswax 

Beeswax is found in a huge number of soap recipes and its potential to improve skin health is one of the reasons for its enduring popularity. Using beeswax in your soap-making recipes means that this ingredient can help to form a protective barrier over your skin and increases moisture levels – both of which can be particularly helpful in the cold winter months. What’s more, beeswax is also a source of Vitamin A, which is known to help support skin’s immune system and has high antioxidant properties. 

Our Top 5 Soap Recipes to Improve the Health of Your Skin
Get Creative with Your Soap Making

#2 – High-quality oils 

Oils are a crucial inclusion in the soapmaking process, but to get the best results for your skin, the quality of the oil is a particularly important consideration. Your best choice will always be to opt for cold pressed oils wherever possible; due to a gentler manufacturing technique, cold pressed oils retain more of the beneficial properties found in the source material – including properties that boost skin health. By opting for the right oils, you can be sure your recipes will enjoy the fullest possible benefits thanks to the better-preserved abundance of natural vitamins and other essential components.

#3 – Cocoa butter

There is something inherently luxurious about cocoa butter, and it can give soaps that little ‘something special’ – while also providing benefits for skin health, too. Cocoa butter has incredible moisturising properties and, like beeswax, can help to form a protective layer over your skin to seal in that moisture for long periods. You should also find that skin elasticity improves with the use of cocoa butter, and there are also antioxidant and soothing benefits to be enjoyed too. 

#4 – Activated charcoal 

The inclusion of activated charcoal in a product that is designed to help clean skin can seem a little odd, but there is actually a long history of charcoal usage in soap – and for good reason. When included, activated charcoal can really help to pull oil and dirt from pores resulting in an incredibly deep and effective clean, and also offers a very gentle exfoliating effect that can help to stimulate cell regeneration. If you’re concerned about the dark colour of the ingredient and its potential to stain, don’t be – you won’t have any such issues when using the finished product.

#5 – Bentonite clay 

As with activated charcoal, bentonite clay may initially seem like an unusual inclusion, but this underrated ingredient is really something of a powerhouse when it comes to benefits. Containing natural detoxifying properties, bentonite clay has been associated with helping to calm angry skin – including skin that is inflamed due to acne – and can help to draw out toxins. Similar to charcoal, it also offers gentle exfoliation, while also helping to even skin tone and reduce the appearance of scars.

In conclusion

By opting for any of the ingredients above, you should be able to enjoy the twin benefits of improving your skin’s health and perfecting your newfound soap-making hobby. Enjoy! 

Lilly Light

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